Recent General Posts

SERVPRO of East Greenville County’s Mother’s Day Contest

5/4/2018 (Permalink)

General SERVPRO of East Greenville County’s Mother’s Day Contest SERVPRO of East Greenville County is happy to celebrate moms and all other caregivers this Mother’s Day.

What better way to celebrate Mom, or any caregiver, than taking some of the burdens off of their shoulders. That is why SERVPRO of East Greenville County is holding a contest to win carpet cleaning for up to 4 rooms.

Entry is easy; all our customers have to do is leave a review on Facebook between now and Mother’s Day (May 13, 2018). And 1 lucky winner will be randomly selected to win SERVPRO carpet cleaning services for UP TO 4 Rooms, a $175 value.

Rules and Conditions

  • One entry per person per review
  • Reviews submitted before May 5, 2018, and after May 13, 2018, do not qualify
  • Prize is not redeemable for cash
  • Prize must be redeemed for residence within 20 miles of our location and must be redeemed before July 31, 2018
  • Prize amount value covers 4 rooms, but service for additional rooms can be purchased (Contact SERVPRO of East Greenville County for pricing details)
  • Prize must be redeemed at one time, and only for 1 location, service is for traffic areas only and must be scheduled in advance (regular business hours only)

SERVPRO Ready Plan: Save Time Recovering from the Unexpected

4/26/2018 (Permalink)

General SERVPRO Ready Plan: Save Time Recovering from the Unexpected SERVPRO Ready Plan allows users to create an emergency ready profile of their facility containing critical information to help speed up response time.

Many of us have a relationship with our smartphone, and why not? Smartphones are one of the greatest multitaskers ever invented. They allow us to connect with friends and family in a myriad of ways. We can summon transportation, food, information and entertainment with the press of a few buttons. Memories are captured and saved in the moment and then can be sent to or pulled from a cloud. They help to monitor physical activity and provide motivation to keep going to reach that goal. Phones are our friends. Chances are that you may be reading this from a phone right now, and if not, you might be checking your pockets or purse to make sure your BFF is not too far off.  

While it is nearly impossible to predict a calamitous event, it is now easier to be prepared to respond and recover from one. ANd our phones can be more than just a friend; they can be a HERO. Thanks to SERVPRO, smartphones can be a great tool during and after a crisis event for risk managers and residential or commercial property managers/owners in Greenville and the surrounding areas. SERVPRO Ready Plan allows users to create profiles that contain that can help to speed up response time. Setting up an Emergency Ready Profile (ERP) and having critical information readily available will allow SERVPRO of East Greenville County to provide faster service and can reduce displacement /downtime and loss of revenue.

SERVPRO Ready Plan Features

  • Designate priority contacts to have decision makers easily accessible
  • Indicate location of shut-off valves, access points, and other essential systems
  • Provides critical building information such as square footage and parking accessibility

You can download the SERVPRO Ready Plan app here, and SERVPRO of East Greenville County is available to assist in setting up ERPs. Visit our website or call (864) 292-3495.

Power Outage Tips

3/20/2018 (Permalink)

General Power Outage Tips Whether or not you know it's coming, a power outage can be a major disturbance. It never hurts to know what to do once the lights go out.

From ready.gov

Before

  • Power outages can happen at any time and are unavoidable, but the costs associated with them can be lessened by installing a home backup generator at a home or business.
  • Have a place in your home where flashlights, a battery-powered radio, and extra batteries can be easily found.
  • If you know the outage is coming, set aside extra water and buy or make extra ice. You can use the ice to keep perishable items cool.
  • Make sure the battery in your smoke detector is fresh. Test the smoke detector on a monthly basis to make sure it's working.
  • Keep an appliance thermometer in the freezer. If the freezer is 40 degrees Fahrenheit or colder when the power returns, all the food is safe.

During

  • If possible, use flashlights instead of candles for emergency lighting. Candles used in unfamiliar settings can be dangerous fire hazards.
  • Turn off or disconnect any appliances, equipment, or electronics that were on when the power went out. When power comes back on, it may come back with momentary "surges" or "spikes" that can damage equipment such as computers and motors in appliances like the air conditioner, refrigerator, washer, or furnace.
  • Leave one light on so you know when the power returns.
  • Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer. This will help keep your food as fresh as possible. Be sure to check food for signs of spoilage.
  • Use generators safely. If you have a portable generator, only run it outdoors with adequate ventilation. Never use a generator indoors or in attached garages. The exhaust fumes contain carbon monoxide, which can be deadly if inhaled.
  • Listen to the radio for updates.

Lead Poising From Paint

3/19/2018 (Permalink)

General Lead Poising From Paint If your home was built before 1978, it likely contains lead-based paint. Deteriorated lead-based paint is present in as many as 24 million residences

No safe levels

Lead is dangerous to people of all ages, but children younger than 6 years old are particularly susceptible. Some of the effects of lead exposure — even low levels — in children and adults can include:

  • Damage to the kidneys and nervous system
  • Learning disabilities
  • Issues with speech, language and behavior
  • Slowed physical growth
  • High-risk pregnancies and fertility issues
  • High blood pressure
  • Problems with digestion

A simple blood test at the doctor's office can detect lead poisoning. The best way to treat lead poisoning is to remove or minimize exposure to lead.

Reducing the risk

Hire a certified inspector or risk assessor to test your home. If your home has lead-based paint, take these steps to keep your family safe.

  • Check surfaces. Lead-based paint in good shape is not a threat. But wear and tear is likely, particularly with painted window frames, doors, doorframes and stairs. Regularly inspect surfaces for peeling, chipping or damage.
  • Keep it clean. Even a few particles of lead-based paint can be hazardous. Regularly wipe down floors, windowsills and other paint-covered surfaces to keep them free from lead dust.
  • Remodel with care. Home improvements that involve scraping or disturbing paint may release toxic lead dust. If you're the DIY type, learn as much as you can about lead-safe practices. Or, better yet ...
  • Hire a pro. Enlist a Lead-Safe Certified renovation firm to help with your next project, or hire a certified lead abatement contractor to ditch lead for good. Find certified inspection, risk assessment, abatement and renovation firms on the EPA's website.
  • Look past the paint. Lead also may be present in soil tracked into the house, on some children's toys and even in older pipes and plumbing. Is there lead in your tap water?
 https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/safety/lead-poisoning-from-paint

Is Lead Lurking in Your Tap Water?

3/19/2018 (Permalink)

General Is Lead Lurking in Your Tap Water? Your drinking water may not be as safe as you think especially if your home has lead plumbing. Corrosion in your home's plumbing and water-supply syst

Know the risks

Lead can affect family members differently depending on their age and development. Children and pregnant women are most at risk.

  • Infants: Delays in physical and mental abilities
  • Children: Brain and nervous system damage, behavioral and learning problems, lower IQ, issues with hearing, slowed growth and anemia
  • Adults: Nervous system impairment, high blood pressure, hypertension, kidney problems, and reproductive issues

Test your water

You can't see, smell, or taste lead, so how do you know if your water is contaminated? The answer: regular testing. If your home was built before 1986, there is a greater risk that your plumbing has lead-containing materials. But regardless of your home's age, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends testing your water regularly if it comes from a private water system. Most public water systems test for contaminants annually. However, these tests reflect the water quality of the entire system not individual homes.

Testing kits are available at most home improvement stores. To get the best results, the EPA recommends sending your sample to a certified laboratory in your area.

Take precautions

If your water tests positive for lead, there are things you can do to reduce risk in the short-term and long-term. But first, visit your doctor to make sure no one in your family has high levels of lead in their system.

Here are some things you can do at home:

  • Use the cold-water tap it has lower levels of lead than warm water.
  • Flush your pipes by running your tap for at least one minute until the water becomes cold if it hasn't been used for the last six hours.
  • Replace lead plumbing pipes. According to the EPA, lead is a dull gray metal that can be easily scratched.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Use a filter certified to remove lead from your water.

If you have questions about your drinking water, call the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/residence/is-lead-lurking-in-your-tap-water

Women in Restoration

11/8/2016 (Permalink)

General Women in Restoration This was a great article from Restoration & Remediation Magazine. Written by Michelle Blevins

Women  in the workforce: a consistently hot topic. Times have changed. Today, it is the norm for a household to have two working parents. Thirty or forty years ago, it was not – it was believed women belonged in the home, and men in the workforce. Generation X, and now millennials, and the up and coming Generation Z are changing the landscape of the workforce in big ways. That must be why the topic of women in the workforce is so popular this presidential election year, perhaps more so than ever.

Did you know 70 percent of women in the U.S. with children younger than 18 work? And according to The Occupational Safety & Health Administration, the number of women in the U.S. construction industry grew by more than 81 percent from 1985 to 2007? Despite that staggering increase, however, only 9 percent of U.S. construction workers are women – which is obviously a very low number compared to other industries.

While we don’t know the exact number of women in the restoration industry specifically, it is very safe to say women are rising in the ranks of restoration companies – and doing it quickly. Women bring a new way of doing things to the table … a sort of quiet strength and the ability to help build others up, and bring out the very best in everyone around them.

When Restoration & Remediation launched the 2016 Recognizing Women in Restoration campaign, we really didn’t know how it would go. All I knew was in my short time in the industry, I have met a number of truly remarkable women who have a bit of a different take on restoration. While most understand this industry is all about helping other people on their worst day, not everyone has the ability to comfort and connect like a woman! They are also shedding more light on the importance of using safe, clean products – especially around children, the elderly, those who are sick, and so on. The women who come to my mind are also strong and not easily intimidated. They know this industry, they know their niche, and they will not back down.

I had the opportunity to attend Violand Management Associates’ Women in Leadership event in June of this year and sat in a room full of women who left me in awe. Each was so intelligent, and full of fresh, innovative ideas on how to tackle everyday problems in a restoration business. As the staff at Violand would say, these women are ready to “kick some glass!” Thank you very much, Violand, for being such a strong supporter of the campaign this year and for your work to help women rise in the ranks of restoration companies around the country.

The Judging Process

A lot of work, planning, and organization went in to this year’s Recognizing Women in Restoration campaign. It was vitally important to R&R that the process be fair and unbiased. To the right, you can “meet” two of the three judges (the third being myself) who thoroughly read and scored every single one of the 40 (yes FORTY!!!) entries and nominations. Each entry was graded based on six categories:

  • Thoroughness of the entry
  • Supporting documentation
  • Journey & experience
  • Job growth & future reach potential
  • Worthiness of recognition
  • Advice to others

Each of those categories was weighted (with some categories being worth more than others), and the judges plugged in numbers on a score sheet to come up with a final score for every entry. There was little to no room for bias as the scores were truly based on every woman’s individual journey, knowledge and wisdom they had to share, credentials, and so on.

Bottom line: this was a well-developed process judged by three women heavily involved in the restoration industry – myself, Susan Pinto, and Ashlee Carpentier. We all have varying degrees and lengths of involvement in the industry, but in the end our scores for every entry came out very similar – and when added together, established a pretty clear winner.

Susan Pinto

Susan’s master’s degree in educational leadership proved very useful in the business world as she migrated from an elementary school teacher to president of Wonder Makers Environmental alongside her husband, Michael Pinto. For 28 years, she has focused on the business aspects of the company including personnel management, customer service, distributor relations, marketing, and financial management. Wonder Makers has a mission of serving God and society by helping people solve environmental, health, and safety problems and Susan works with each client with unparalleled kindness and integrity.

Ashlee Carpentier

Ashlee is married to her best friend and business partner, Shaun Carpentier. Together, they own Complete DKI and 1-800-Packouts of the Gulf Coast. Ashlee has a huge heart for those experiencing a disaster, and put that passion in action serving as the Board Chair for a local Red Cross Chapter.  She is also an avid supporter of the Escambia County Professional Fire Fighters Charity and Complete DKI volunteers time and resources for the Trauma Intervention Program.  Ashlee also serves as Board President for the Gulf Coast Association of Insurance Professions, is the membership chair for her local chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association and an active board member of NAIOP of Northwest Florida.

Winner: Annissa Coy

Who: Annissa Coy

What: Owner and founder of Firehouse Education and Mobile Clean Systems

When: She has been in the restoration industry since 2000.

Where: Based in Spokane, Wash.

Why: “I truly love helping people and there is no better place to do this than the restoration industry, in my opinion.”

How: Annissa runs both a mobile contents cleaning business, and a school for cleaners and restorers.

From Bookkeeper to Owner

Annissa got her start in the restoration industry in 2000, hired in as a bookkeeper for a company grossing about $360,000 a year. She quickly worked her way up to office manager and began taking on some of the marketing as well.

“Within three years, I helped increase the gross revenue to about $900,000,” Annissa explained. “At this point, the owner incorporated and I became the CEO and ran the business overseeing all operations, purchases and marketing.”

In 2006, the owner sold the business to Annissa and her husband, Kevin. Two years later, they started Mobile Clean Systems – an onsite, 34-foot trailer that is specially designed and engineered to clean contents as efficiently and effectively as possible, even at a home in the middle of nowhere.

Then in 2009, they launched Firehouse Education – a hands-on school teaching contents restoration and systems management, plus marketing.

Today, Annissa and her crew travel to CAT losses all over the country, and do residential contents restoration (mainly fires) in the Western U.S.

“I went from an employee and having zero restoration experience, to owning the restoration business in just six years,” Annissa said. “Then within two years of owning the company, we grossed $1.3 million in revenue and increased our net profit by 1,003 percent.”

Finding Success

Annissa takes pride that Mobile Clean’s business is 100 percent referral-based. She does not hesitate for a second to ask a customer for a testimonial after a successful contents cleaning job.

“I truly love helping people and there is no better place to do this than the restoration industry, in my opinion,” she said. “I am good at creating systems and helping others feel comfortable and cared for. My biggest contributions to the industry would be my natural ability to teach and to help others see things differently and encourage them to challenge the status quo.”

She admits when she first came into the industry 16 years ago, she shook things up a bit by challenging the way things were done, and suggesting better, more efficient ways to clean contents. She is also first to admit the path into this tight-knit industry, especially the niche of contents, wasn’t easy as she was surrounded by people who had been doing restoration for decades. But she also felt she had some insights that could help.

Through Firehouse Education and her YouTube channel, Annissa was able to create a voice for herself.

“I was the first one to take my camera on CAT losses and out on job sites and film what was happening step-by-step,” she said. “I was also one of the first to capture video testimonials onsite from homeowners and adjusters and post them to my website, blog, and throughout my marketing.”

 

Annissa’s Advice

“Don’t think you have to do things the way they have always been done. Constantly ask yourself ‘can this be done better, faster, and with more care?’” she said. “And never stop asking yourself how you can serve your clients better. Bring your heart to the game every single day. It’s what your clients and your team need and want from you most.”

First Runner-Up

Who: Jessika James

What: Certified Indoor Industrialist | Owner, JMJ Consulting and Inspections

When: A lifetime! She joined her family’s construction and restoration business when she was just 10 years old, and her high school graduation gift in 1978 was a Chevy van with a truckmount. The note from her dad said: “Congratulations! You are a carpet cleaner! Rent is now $300.” For Jessika, this was a dream come true.

Where: Jessika works nationwide as a consultant and previously had a variety of roles in the industry including restoration company owner, ProChem’s education director, IICRC instructor, and more.

Why: “My father was very work-oriented. As a child, my weekly allowance wasn’t for setting the table or doing the dishes, but helping out in the family construction and restoration business,” Jessika said. “I would do everything from setting up equipment to fire damage packouts to filing in the office on the weekends.”

Jessika’s journey is far too impressive to do justice in a short write up, but she has worn a number of hats over the years, and earned a number of IICRC and other certifications.

“I have had the incredible opportunity to work with and learn from some of the industry superstars! Carl Williams, Jeff Bishop, Ron Toney, Tom Hill, Steve Marsh – they all played a major part in my in-field experiences, then my movement into the education area,” Jessika recalled. “Teaching classes and seminars is always my favorite thing to do, and what I feel is my largest contribution to the industry.”

Her Advice:

“Although it is still a largely male-dominated industry, women are seen more and more frequently in all different jobs, from packing out houses on fire damage jobs, to remediating water and mold projects, to independently running their own businesses! The biggest piece of advice I could give would be- spread the news! This is a great industry for women!”

She also said: “It is amazing how just in the past 10-15 years, we have seen so many strong, independent, educated, professional women joining the workforce in the cleaning and restoration fields – and kicking some serious behind!”

Second Runner-Up

Who: Kris Rudarmel

What: President, Anchor Restoration

When: Anchor Restoration was created in 2005

Where: South Jordan, Utah

Why: Kris and her husband, Frank, had an unpleasant experience with an emergency flood service in the early 2000’s, inspiring them to start their own restoration company to better serve the needs in their community.

“I had a dream to create an experience for my clients that was about more than just flood damage cleanup,” she said. “I wanted to stand out and provide an eclectic customer experience and build a company that my team members would be proud to work for and share a vision with what I had created.”

Kris’s business has won a number of awards, including being named to Utah Business Magazine’s “30 Women in Watch” in 2013, NAWBO’s “Woman Business Owner of the Year” Award in 2013, and the Enterprise 7 Award: Woman Business Owner (for the seventh time!) and a number of others.

Her advice:

“It is vitally important to savor your successes and appreciate your failures. Our failures teach us a lot and make us strong,” she said. “Believe in yourself! Your beliefs become your reality! Do not be afraid to dream BIG! Find or create passion in whatever you do and stay out of your comfort zone by feeling the fear and doing it anyway.”

This is Only the Beginning!

R&R has big plans for the Recognizing Women in Restoration campaign for 2017! Be on the lookout for a call to action in the beginning of the year, and some exciting announcements and evolutions in the campaign! We hope this is only the beginning of recognizing women who are truly “kicking some glass” and hope those who didn’t win this year (including our runners-up) will continue to be involved in future!

To all the women who participated this year, and the people who took the time to nominate a woman in the industry who they respect, thank you!

By Michelle Blevins

From - RESTORATION & REMEDIATION MAGAZINE

October 2016

Upstate of SC Drought

11/2/2016 (Permalink)

General Upstate of SC Drought This photo shows just how serious the drought is in South Carolina.

SPARTANBURG, SC (WSPA) – Despite the flooding for the low country of SC the drought is getting worse for the Upstate.

We are more than 8 inches below average rainfall for the year at GSP due to missing out on the two tropical cyclones to come up the coast.

The United States drought monitor shows the Upstate ranging from severe to extreme drought in a few spots. But the state climatologist, Dr. Hope Mizzell says our drought monitor in SC is based on several factors, not just precipitation. Forest fire threat, rainfall, and water supply are some of the factors taken into account when considering the drought status. Regardless, Mizzell says the upstate is in Severe Drought and expects that to be upgraded during this week’s meeting with the South Carolina Drought Response Committee.

 

Dr. Mizzell says the water supply for the upstate is fine for now, but need to be monitored as we move through our driest months of the year. She says that drought relief is not expected for November, but that is normal. However, Mizzell stressed that the Winter months is when we replenish the reservoirs before the hot and dry Summer conditions approach. Winter is the time we need normal rainfall, not necessarily above normal precipitation.

Mizzell says our drought monitor at the state level is geared more towards water supply problems and the committee normally meets every 8 weeks to avoid the windshield wiper effect of changing the drought status frequently. However, as conditions prove needed she says the committee will meet every 4 to 6 weeks.

At this time Mizzell says she does not see any indication of any state level water restrictions and that would have to come at a local level.

She encourages everyone to be good stewards when it comes to water resources. A full list of ways to conserve water on a daily basis is found at the SC DNR website listed below.

The reason you may see more updates from NC is that they meet every week and use their drought monitor directly off of the United States Drought Monitor.

References:
http://www.dnr.sc.gov/climate/sco/Drought/drought_response_program.php
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/drought/201609#det-pdi
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?SC

What makes you an expert?

10/28/2016 (Permalink)

General What makes you an expert? IICRC sets the standard in the water and mold cleanup industry. Always use a IICRC certified firm.

In the realm of water and mold, what makes someone an expert? I get asked that question a lot. When I go out behind another mitigation company, I can tell by the questions a homeowner ask, whether they have talked to someone that is knowledgeable or just someone looking to turn a dollar. To often in a field of work that is unregulated, we have people or even companies that claim to be the expert, but have never taken one course on the subject.

One of the first questions that a homeowner should ask is, are you a IICRC certified firm and what certifications does the person onsite have. IICRC sets the standards for both water mitigation and mold remediation. They administer the training and produce the protocols that we in this industry follow.

So why is this so important? If your loss is a self pay loss, you could be throwing thousands of dollars out the window to someone that claims to be an expert.

Did it really happen?

10/19/2016 (Permalink)

General Did it really happen? Taking pictures of your loss is so easy with a smart phone. Before and after photos are critical.

I was recently called to appear in court as a character witness for a company that we have a relationship with. This company is a great referral partner for us and they are a really good company. They have been in business for over 30 years and have never once been sued.

I showed up for court just as I was asked, and soon there after the proceedings began. Both parties submitted items into evidence and I could see that the defense submitted lots of documents, but no pictures. As we know in the insurance business, if you do not have a picture its hard to get paid for the work that was performed. We have a saying in our office that " if you didn't write it down or take a picture of it, it didn't really happen." Pictures are critical for any service work. Whether the picture shows previous damage, damage that you may have caused or the pictures show before and after work.

If you don't take pictures and write it down, did it really happen?

Does Your Greenville Home Have A Mold Problem?

8/4/2016 (Permalink)

Microscopic mold spores naturally occur almost everywhere, both outdoors and indoors. This makes it impossible to remove all mold from a home or business. Therefore, mold remediation reduces the mold spore count back to its natural or baseline level. Some restoration businesses advertise “mold removal” and even guarantee to remove all mold, which is a fallacy. Consider the following mold facts:

  • Mold is present almost everywhere, indoors and outdoors.
  • Mold spores are microscopic and float along in the air and may enter your home through windows, doors, or AC/heating systems or even hitch a ride indoors on your clothing or a pet.
  • Mold spores thrive on moisture. Mold spores can quickly grow into colonies when exposed to water. These colonies may produce allergens and irritants.
  • Before mold remediation can begin, any sources of water or moisture must be addressed. Otherwise, the mold may return.
  • Mold often produces a strong, musty odor and can lead you to possible mold problem areas.
  • Even higher-than-normal indoor humidity can support mold growth. Keep indoor humidity below 45 percent.

If your home or business has a mold problem, we can inspect and assess your property and use our specialized training, equipment, and expertise to remediate your mold infestation.

If You See Signs of Mold, Call Us Today –864-292-3495

National Sorry Charlie Day

4/6/2016 (Permalink)

Don't be rejected by a damage in your home.  

April 6th is observed as National Sorry Charlie Day.  This day is dedicated to all the times you have been rejected.  

Rejection can be defined by many meanings....refusal, declining, turning down and dismissing to name a few.  Don't allow a damage in your home turn into a rejection.  

-Neglected water damage can cause a possible denied claim.

-Odor in your home can cause a rejection of a potential sale.

-Dismissing soot damage can pose some serious health risks.  

Call us today for a scope of any damage in your home.

#NationalSorryCharlieDay 

Greer Chamber of Commerce Member!

4/27/2015 (Permalink)

General Greer Chamber of Commerce Member! We're a member of the Greer Chamber of Commerce!

We are an active member of the Greer Chamber of Commerce. We take great pride in being a part of the Greenville County community. We understand that communities like ours hold America together. We want to do our part to ensure our community thrives by helping those less fortunate, keeping the area safe and making our community the best it can be.

View our member profile!

Get free alerts to when you will be able to see the International Space Station!

2/5/2015 (Permalink)

General Get free alerts to when you will be able to see the International Space Station! ISS

We like tech stuff.  So when we found a website that allows you to receive text or email alerts as to when you will be able to see the International Space Station (ISS) fly by, we had to share it.  Go to http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/ and sign up.  The first time we saw the ISS stream by, goosebumps emerged!